talksadults

Gallery Chat: Eddy Portnoy on "Ink is not just for writing Yiddish novels: Jews and Tattoos"

Monday, Apr 8, 2019 | 12:30–1pm

ADMISSION: Free with Museum admission.

Best-selling author Eddy Portnoy returns with more stories about Jews behaving badly in early twentieth-century New York. This talk is presented in conjunction with Lew the Jew and His Circle: Origins of American Tattoo. Book sales and signing to follow.

About The Speaker
Eddy Portnoy

Eddy Portnoy received his Ph.D. from the Jewish Theological Seminary. His dissertation was on cartoons of the Yiddish press. He also holds an M.A in Yiddish Studies from Columbia, having written on artists/writers Zuni Maud and Yosl Cutler. His articles on Jewish popular culture phenomena have appeared in The Drama ReviewPolin, and The International Journal of Comic Art. In addition to speaking on Jewish popular culture throughout Europe and North America, he has consulted on museum exhibits at the Museum of the City of New York, Musée d'art et d'histoire du judaïsme in Paris, and the Joods Historisch Museum in Amsterdam. He is Senior Researcher & Exhibition Curator at YIVO, as well as YIVO’s Academic Advisor for the Max Weinreich Center.  

About the Exhibition

Lew the Jew and His Circle: Origins of American Tattoo presents the work of “Lew the Jew,” born Albert Morton Kurzman (1880–1954), one of the most influential artists tattooing in NYC’s Bowery at the beginning of the twenti­eth century. The exhibition includes previously unpublished and rare original tattoo artwork, photos, and correspondence between Lew and San Francisco tattooers “Brooklyn Joe” Lieber and C. J. ”Pop” Eddy. 

Alberts Tattoo on S.F. tattooer Pop Eddy's business card, early twentieth century. Courtesy of Don Ed Hardy. Photo: Lew's Brooklyn shop, ca. 1915. Courtesy of Don Ed Hardy. Opening night photos by Gary Sexton Photography.

Alberts Tattoo on S.F. tattooer Pop Eddy's business card, early twentieth century. Courtesy of Don Ed Hardy. Photo: Lew's Brooklyn shop, ca. 1915. Courtesy of Don Ed Hardy. Opening night photos by Gary Sexton Photography.

ACCESSIBILITY

The CJM is committed to creating an accessible environment for all of our visitors. The Museum offers accessible seating for all public programs, a friendly environment for service animals, as well as FM assistive listening devices (ALDs) and portable gallery stools. American sign language interpretation (ASL) can be scheduled for all programs with at least two weeks notice by emailing access@thecjm.org or by calling 415.655.7856 (relay calls welcome).

supporters

The CJM’s Gallery Chat Program is made possible by Maribelle and Stephen Leavitt.

Public Programs are made possible by the Koret Foundation. Program support is provided by the Alan Templeton Endowment in Memory of Lieselotte and David Templeton.

Image Credit

Tattoo flash, Alberts Tattoo, early twentieth century. Courtesy of Don Ed Hardy.