Susan Hiller: The J.Street Project

A photographic journey through the streets of Germany

June 18, 2009 - August 18, 2009

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Susan Hiller, Detail of ‘The J.Street Project (Index)’, 2002-2005, Wall-based installation: 303 archival colour inkjets mounted on Kapaline, oak frames, index and map in adhesive vinyl, courtesy the artist and Timothy Taylor Gallery, London

About

There are 303 roads, streets, and paths in Germany, whose names refer to a Jewish presence. Artist Susan Hiller has visited all of them over a three-year period, filming and taking photographs of these historically evocative places. The J. Street Project is an exhibition of photographs, video and an artist’s book that explores the landscape’s capacity to memorialize. Hiller’s subject matter is the tracing of an absence, explicitly named on maps and street signs as “Judenstrasse” or “Judenweg.” These banal markers invest ordinary German places, inner-city shopping streets, dreamy lanes, anonymous suburbs, and secluded country roads, with an eloquent silence. Hiller’s approach to the enormity of the Holocaust is completely fresh and succeeds in pulling in audiences who no longer feel capable of considering the subject and engages them in a new dialogue about survival and renewal.

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Susan Hiller , Detail of ‘The J.Street Project (Index)’, 2002-2005, Wall-based installation: 303 archival colour inkjets mounted on Kapaline, oak frames, index and map in adhesive vinyl, Courtesy the artist and Timothy Taylor Gallery, London


Supporters

This exhibition has been organized by the Contemporary Jewish Museum and is generously supported by a lead grant from the Koret and Taube Foundations, with additional support from Maribelle and Stephen Leavitt, Barbara and Kurt Gronowski, and the Consulate General of Germany - San Francisco.

Lead Inaugural Year Exhibition Support:

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